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The on-going rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) that is fuelling climate change is also driving significant changes in the waters off our coasts.

At the bottom of our lakes are NIWA divers with waterproof clipboards. Sarah Fraser jumps in to find out what they’re doing.
When fire came to Pigeon Valley, Fire and Emergency came to NIWA.
NIWA is bringing together decision makers and influencers from across New Zealand this month to shape the science we need to respond to our changing climate.
Dr Sara Mikaloff-Fletcher is looking to turn the internationally accepted science of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions upside down—and the rest of the world is watching closely.
Susan Pepperell reports on a region trying to cope with a changing climate
Taonga species such as tuna (freshwater eels), kōura (freshwater crayfish) and kākahi (freshwater mussels) are central to the identity and wellbeing of many Māori.
Demands for new weather and climate predictions are unprecedented as nations struggle to understand their exposure to risk from severe climatic events.
A science-fiction fan, amateur actor, and eternal optimist, is now NIWA’s Chief Scientist for Climate, Atmosphere and Hazards. Susan Pepperell finds out more.
If you’re planning a visit to the National Agricultural Fieldays at Mystery Creek this week, here’s what you can expect from the weather.
Visitors to NIWA’s stand at this year’s Fieldays are invited to go diving into the Rotorua lakes—without having to get wet.
With just a few days of autumn left, prolonged warm weather and less rain than normal means some spots across New Zealand are heading for the record books.
New Zealand’s newest citizens like the solitary life, have leopard-like markings, and can each weigh up to 600kg.
Thermal images taken by a NIWA scientist during this year’s aerial survey of South Island glaciers have revealed in extraordinary detail how heat in the surrounding landscape is affecting the ice.
NIWA freshwater scientists are pinning their hopes of solving an age-old mystery on 10 female longfin eels who are about to begin an epic journey to their spawning grounds somewhere in the Pacific Ocean.
Scientists have taken a step closer to predicting marine heatwaves with new NIWA-led research finding a link between their formation and the length of time sea temperatures are warmer than normal.^.
Grant Dalton, CEO of Emirates Team New Zealand, and NIWA CEO John Morgan recently signed an agreement that will see NIWA’s scientists working closely with Emirates Team New Zealand over the next few years.
A new scientific assessment of Hector’s and Māui dolphins has led to a revised understanding of their biology, their distribution and their main threats.
NIWA researchers are out on Lake Whakatipu for the next week mapping the lake floor for the first time.
Arrowtown may be known for its picturesque autumn scenery, but in winter this tiny Central Otago town has a problem.

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