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Read about the important science being undertaken at NIWA, and how it affects New Zealanders. 

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As the world battles a deadly pandemic, New Zealand school students have been beavering away at science fair projects researching the effectiveness of our own COVID-19 protection measures.
At the bottom of the Southern Ocean, near Cape Adare in East Antarctica, lies an undersea ridge which until this month was only known by its co-ordinates: -71.2132 latitude, 172.1649 longitude.
Campbell Gardiner explains how hundreds of lines of computer code generated each week are helping biosecurity authorities keep a close eye on a plant pathogen.
Albatrosses may be masters of the skies, but they are surprisingly vulnerable on the water. Campbell Gardiner talks to two scientists working to keep these magnificent seabirds airborne.
This award-winning kingfish sashimi dish is creating quite a splash – but it doesn’t come from the sea. We look at NIWA’s latest aquaculture success story and the new opportunities it’s on path to deliver.
Getting tangled up in seaweed or using supercomputers to unravel climate change – NIWA scientists go to great lengths to find fresh answers.
NIWA’s Chief Executive John Morgan looks at the role science will play in New Zealand’s post-Covid recovery.
Five specialist NIWA divers were left ‘gasping’ during their recent plunge under the ice near Scott Base.
It has been a whirlwind first six months for Ngāpera Keegan and Tekiteora Rolleston-Gabel, the first two young researchers in NIWA’s newly established Māori Graduate Internship Programme.
Some of the most striking images of lockdown around the world have been the blue skies of cities ordinarily choking in smog. From New Delhi to Los Angeles, Beijing to Paris, the changes were so remarkable they were visible from space.
New ways to address environmental sustainability challenges.
Coronavirus border restrictions mean six NIWA staff face four straight months at sea in a bid to keep an international ocean research project afloat.
NIWA scientists are heading to the waters around Whakaari/White Island in the Bay of Plenty next week to survey changes to the seafloor.
Among the multitude of New Zealand climate statistics there is one record that continues to be broken month after month.
New measurements from the ocean under the centre of the Ross Ice Shelf have significantly improved our understanding of the complex processes that drive melting in Antarctica.
Scientists analysing end-of-summer snowline survey photos have estimated that 13 million cubic meters of ice have been lost from just one glacier from 2016 to 2019.
What does science tell us about New Zealand freshwater crayfish?
What does science tell us about New Zealand eels?
For more than 20 years NIWA scientists have been nurturing three plants that are the only examples of their kind in existence.
NIWA scientists have set up air quality sensors every 100 metres across Arrowtown in what is believed to be the world’s densest air monitoring network.

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