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Expect to hear a lot more about climate change in the news in the weeks ahead – and a lot about NIWA’s work underpinning the science that is signalling a warmer world right now and its effects in the future.
NIWA meteorologists are keeping an eye on an unusual atmospheric phenomenon that is amassing in the polar stratosphere.
We’re now halfway through 2019 and NIWA climate data from the first six months tell a dramatic story of weather and climate extremes.
We’re here already – the shortest day is tomorrow (Saturday) and after this, it gets progressively lighter out to the longest day of the year in December.
Understanding how the Antarctic oceans work is vital to predicting the world’s future climate and the implications of climate change for humankind and the planet.
If you’re planning a visit to the National Agricultural Fieldays at Mystery Creek this week, here’s what you can expect from the weather.
With just a few days of autumn left, prolonged warm weather and less rain than normal means some spots across New Zealand are heading for the record books.
Thermal images taken by a NIWA scientist during this year’s aerial survey of South Island glaciers have revealed in extraordinary detail how heat in the surrounding landscape is affecting the ice.
Scientists have taken a step closer to predicting marine heatwaves with new NIWA-led research finding a link between their formation and the length of time sea temperatures are warmer than normal.^.
Grant Dalton, CEO of Emirates Team New Zealand, and NIWA CEO John Morgan recently signed an agreement that will see NIWA’s scientists working closely with Emirates Team New Zealand over the next few years.
Hotspots in the North Island are currently found in Aupouri Peninsula, interior Manawatu-Whanganui, and interior Hawke’s Bay. South Island hotspots are currently found in interior Marlborough, a small area near Christchurch, coastal southern Canterbury, and a portion of Stewart Island.
Part of the world’s largest ice shelf is melting 10 times faster than the overall average and solar-heated waters beneath the ice shelf are to blame, NIWA research has found.
The latest state of the environment report released today provides New Zealanders with clear evidence that our climate, freshwater and marine systems are changing, says NIWA.
Across the North Island, soil moisture levels generally changed little during the past week. In the South Island, increases were observed along most of the West Coast, interior Otago, and Marlborough Sounds, while decreases occurred in Stewart Island.
Across the North Island, soil moisture levels decreased in big parts of the island during the past week due to meagre rainfall. In the South Island, soil moisture decreases were observed across much of the island.
An increase in soil moisture in many areas across the North Island, including Northland, Auckland, Waikato, eastern Bay of Plenty, Gisborne, and Taranaki. No significant change in the South Island. Outlook is for low to moderate rainfall, countrywide.
NIWA today released its March Climate Summary which confirms temperatures during the first month of autumn were at record highs in many places.
Hotspots continue to be found across a large part of Northland, Auckland, northern Waikato, and interior Bay of Plenty, as well as central Manawatu-Whanganui and Napier south to Wairarapa. South Island hotspots are currently located in a portion of interior Marlborough, eastern Banks Peninsula, south coastal Otago and parts of lower Southland.
Hotspots are now located across the majority of Northland, Auckland, northern Waikato, and interior Bay of Plenty, as well as central Manawatu-Whanganui and Napier south to Wairarapa. South Island hotspots are now located in a portion of interior Marlborough, eastern Banks Peninsula, and the lower Southland coast.

A weekly update describing soil moisture across the country to help assess whether severely to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.  Regions experiencing these soil moisture deficits are deemed “hotspots”.  Persistent hotspot regions have the potential to develop into drought.

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