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If Santa is quick he can hop on a ridge of high pressure for his big trip to New Zealand very soon.
Across the North Island, notable increases in soil moisture levels were observed in the southwest, from Taranaki south to Wellington.
Across the North Island, notable decreases in soil moisture levels were observed from Northland to Waikato, including the Coromandel Peninsula.
New Zealand has just experienced its hottest November on record, according to NIWA climate scientists.
Across the North Island, soil moisture levels decreased island-wide during the past week due to meagre rainfall and above average temperatures.
Novel handwriting recognition project casts new light on historic weather data.
Across the North Island, soil moisture levels increased in many places during the past week. In the South Island, soil moisture levels generally decreased in the east and a slightly increased in the west.
Across the North Island, moderate to large increases in soil moisture levels were observed in most locations due to substantial rainfall in the past week. In the South Island, soil moisture levels increased everywhere during the past week, and significantly so in many places.
Across the North Island, soil moisture levels decreased everywhere during the past week due to meagre rainfall and above average temperatures. The most significant decreases were observed across the northern half of the North Island, where soil moisture levels are now below normal nearly everywhere from Northland to Waikato and Bay of Plenty.
Across the North Island, soil moisture levels generally decreased slightly during the past week. In the South Island, soil moisture levels decreased slightly in most locations during the past week, although slight increases were observed in coastal Otago and Southland.
This weekend, after a rather cool October, the beginning of November brings out the heat.
Expect to hear a lot more about climate change in the news in the weeks ahead – and a lot about NIWA’s work underpinning the science that is signalling a warmer world right now and its effects in the future.
NIWA meteorologists are keeping an eye on an unusual atmospheric phenomenon that is amassing in the polar stratosphere.
We’re now halfway through 2019 and NIWA climate data from the first six months tell a dramatic story of weather and climate extremes.
We’re here already – the shortest day is tomorrow (Saturday) and after this, it gets progressively lighter out to the longest day of the year in December.
Understanding how the Antarctic oceans work is vital to predicting the world’s future climate and the implications of climate change for humankind and the planet.
If you’re planning a visit to the National Agricultural Fieldays at Mystery Creek this week, here’s what you can expect from the weather.
With just a few days of autumn left, prolonged warm weather and less rain than normal means some spots across New Zealand are heading for the record books.
Thermal images taken by a NIWA scientist during this year’s aerial survey of South Island glaciers have revealed in extraordinary detail how heat in the surrounding landscape is affecting the ice.
Scientists have taken a step closer to predicting marine heatwaves with new NIWA-led research finding a link between their formation and the length of time sea temperatures are warmer than normal.^.

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