Fisheries news

News and media releases related to the our fisheries-related work.

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New Zealand’s leading freshwater and estuarine research body is harnessing the national curiosity about ecology to find out more about grey mullet.
Each March, oyster lovers descend on the catch of Bluff’s best bivalves – a seasonal delicacy from one of the last remaining wild oyster fisheries on the planet.
NIWA scientists aboard RV Tangaroa have been trawling the central Ross Sea calculating the abundance of the prey species.
A programme to help Tonga maximise the economic benefits of commercial fishing has been launched in the country’s capital, Nuku’alofa.
More than 50 scientists from across the globe are meeting in Wellington this week to discuss how newly developed technology can best help countries manage their marine fisheries.

Scientists are starting to get a better picture of how recreational fisheries change over time, thanks to a few web cameras and a bit of help from the public.

Paua is a New Zealand summer delicacy.

When someone says "paua fritter" they are usually referring to something made from blackfoot paua. The blackfoot paua (Haliotis iris) species is endemic to New Zealand and found throughout the country. It is most abundant on shallow reefs.

The mako shark is fast and fascinating. The shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, has been recorded swimming at speeds of about 100km/h. It's the fastest of the world's shark species. Mako sharks are found in waters right around New Zealand. Only occasionally are they found close inshore.

NIWA scientists trawled deep – deeper than ever before – down to 2,730 metres, and found new-to-science fish close to the deep ocean seafloor during their latest research voyage.

Moored underwater cameras have exposed the secret lives of orange roughy nearly 900 metres below the ocean surface.

A New Zealand-led survey of young toothfish in Antarctica has found high densities of the highly-prized fish in the southern Ross Sea.

Overfishing and sedimentation have reduced the number of natural beds of green-lipped mussels (Perna canaliculus), in soft sediment habitats, from many regions around New Zealand.

They don't have a voice – but they do make sounds.

NIWA's research vessel Tangaroa will set sail for the Chatham Rise tonight to improve our understanding of how marine ecosystems affect commercially exploited fish, and how commercial fisheries affect the marine food-web. The Chatham Rise, a large plateau between the South Island and Chatham Islands, is our most productive fishing ground.

A landmark publication by New Zealand's most distinguished freshwater fish expert, Dr R. M. (Bob) McDowall, was released posthumously this week.

The oyster season runs until the end of August this year and so far the news is all good for oyster fishers and oyster lovers.

If you would like to contribute to a Victoria University study about marine reserves in New Zealand please complete these surveys for Taputeranga marine reserve and Kapiti marine reserve.
This research is being performed by a PHD student at Victoria University and is not related to NIWA. However, we support the aims of the research and are happy to provide a link from our site to promote a good response to the survey.

NIWA marine scientists will use baited-underwater-video (BUV) to assess blue cod stocks in Fiordland this week. It's the first time this unique way of monitoring fish stocks has been used in the fiords.

During late March and April, NIWA fisheries scientists will be tagging hundreds of juvenile tarakihi in Tasman and Golden Bays, in an effort to learn more about their nursery habits and habitat.

NIWA studies reveal that different movement and behaviours exist within snapper stock – some snapper stay at home, while some range for hundreds of kilometres. Our studies also show that marine reserves may well be affecting the behaviour of fish that inhabit them.

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