Media Release

The driest soils across the North Island compared to normal for this time of the year are found in Whangarei and Kaipara districts, along with Taupo and Tararua. No hotspots are currently in place in the South Island.
The largest hotspot in the North Island continues to be found in Napier and southern Hastings District. A new, very small hotspot has also emerged this week near Cape Reinga. No hotspots are currently in place in the South Island.
With the recent rain, the soil moisture has generally improved across the North Island since last week. However, the soils are still drier than normal for the time of year in eastern Northland, western Auckland, western Waikato, western Taranaki, as well as Hawke’s Bay, central and southern Manawatu-Wanganui and Wairarapa.
NIWA climate scientists are calling for volunteers to unearth weather secrets from the past – including those recorded by members of Captain Robert Scott’s doomed trip to the South Pole in 1912.
Scientists will be trying to understand how Antarctic-based Weddell seals see the world when they head to the ice next week.
Soils are drier than normal for the time of year in the majority of the North Island, excluding the eastern Gisborne region where the soil moisture is near average. Parts of Queenstown-Lakes District in Otago, the Grey and Buller Districts in the West Coast, northeastern Marlborough, and the Waimate District in southern Canterbury experience well below average rainfall for this time of year, while the rest of the South Island had near normal rainfall.
NIWA scientists are hoping they may one day be able to “listen” to kelp forests in the waters around New Zealand to find out how they are faring.
A chance find by a woman walking on a Northland beach is now helping scientists learn more about mako sharks.
There are no currently no hotspots, but an area to monitor is in the southern Hurunui District in northern Canterbury.
A NIWA scientist who spent years poring over handwritten scientific notes stored in about 50 large wooden drawers, has seen the fruits of her labour now being used in ways she never imagined.
Once, or twice a year, when the tides and moon align, the brightly coloured jewel anemone will spawn, sending trails into the ocean in a spectacle that few get to witness.
The new science season at Antarctica is just a few days away from opening and NIWA researchers are busy packing containers and shipping them to the ice where they will be reunited with them in the coming months.
A NIWA-led team has today been awarded a multi-million dollar research grant that will help drive major advances in understanding of New Zealand’s carbon emissions and uptake
A cool start to spring is about to be replaced by a sudden burst of warmth, according to NIWA meteorologist Ben Noll.
Students have been combing their creative and practical sides in the lead up to this year’s NIWA North Harbour Science and Technology Fair.
Students are a sceptical lot going by the entry titles into this year’s NIWA Wellington Regional Science and Technology Fair.
First-time science fair entrants Oliver Gunson and Jayden Kumar are on a mission to help reduce skin cancer rates caused by New Zealand’s harsh sun.
The findings of the most complex underwater coastal survey of the seafloor undertaken in New Zealand, including previously undiscovered natural features and sunken boats, are to be formally presented to the Marlborough community tomorrow.
Identifying dolphins using photos of the unique pigment patterns on their fins can be used to help in the management of a species, says a NIWA scientist.
A 13-year-old Waikato school student has been testing his mother’s assurance that sunscreens past their expiry dates are still effective.
A group of year 12 students in South Auckland has been tackling one of New Zealand’s biggest health issues – our high skin cancer rate.
A project to restore a stream catchment in Kaikōura—damaged in the 2016 earthquake—is being described as inspirational by NIWA scientists.
What do taewa Māori (Māori potatoes) and Swiss cheese have in common? For NIWA social scientist Stephen FitzHerbert it’s much more than a tasty snack.
Cathy Kilroy is quick to admit she’s a person who doesn’t like throwing anything away.
A senior NIWA scientist is concerned many councils are having difficulty “getting off the starting blocks” when it comes to planning for coastal climate change.

Pages

 
Subscribe to RSS - Media Release