Rivers

Latest news

A new study has identified seven freshwater species native to Aotearoa-New Zealand that will likely be highly or very highly vulnerable to climate change.
Under the light of the moon where the river meets the sea, NIWA researchers are planning to catch tiny fish that are all but invisible to the naked eye.
It may be rubbish to everyone else, but to Amanda Valois each little scrap of plastic on a river bank or in a waterway tells a valuable story.
Christchurch’s Red Zone is to be the focal point of a scientific experiment involving street lights and insects over summer. 

Our work

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and NIWA worked collaboratively during 2018-19 to support Ngāti Maniapoto whānau to reconnect with and participate in the assessment of their freshwater according to their values.
Currently there are gaps in understanding of user decision making processes and public needs and requirements for river forecasting in New Zealand. This project aims to bridge NIWA river forecasting aspirations and capabilities with both the public and decision makers’ requirements.
The ability to properly manage our freshwater resources requires a solid understanding of the flora and fauna which live in and interact with them.
The alp-fed braided rivers of Canterbury are treasured for their landscape, recreational amenities, salmon- and trout-fishing, and unique riverine environments – which provide habitat to a host of endangered birds – but they are under threat from land-use intensification and a growing demand for irrigation water.

Latest videos

The world's most mysterious fish

A video about The world's most mysterious fish. NIWA researchers are working with iwi to try to unlock the secrets of New Zealand tuna—freshwater eels. Every year tiny, glass eels wash in on the tide at river mouths along our coast. But where do they come from and how do they get there?

 

Overview of SHMAK
How healthy is your stream? SHMAK—the New Zealand Stream Health Monitoring and Assessment Kit—has been designed to help you find out.
A day out measuring at Molesworth
A day out measuring at Molesworth
Modelling vegetation-impacted morphodynamics in braided rivers
NIWA is developing numerical models for predicting how the morphology of braided rivers responds to flow regulation and invasive exotic woody vegetation.

Welcome to Freshwater Update 54. This issue features some of the latest work from our Freshwater and Estuaries teams, Water Quality maps and information and  River flow maps for Autumn.

Latest news from the centre includes: Float your boat! Scientists use hi-tech miniature Q-boat to measure river flows 

Welcome to Freshwater Update for May 2012.

This issue contains news about work from NIWA's Freshwater team, and Water Quality maps and information for the period January, February, March 2012.

As well as the articles below, the following have been added to our website:

Robot spies make new science discoveries in Fiordland's World Heritage Park

Small native fish eat a range of benthic invertebrates in streams. The larvae of mayflies and caddisflies are the most important food species, with chironomids being important for juvenile fish and in streams where all other prey are scarce.
River floods occur when water spills from a river channel onto land that is normally dry, and are one of New Zealand's costliest natural hazards.

Welcome to Freshwater Update.

Here we bring you a review and outlook of New Zealand's freshwater resources, seasonal water quality information and news of our latest freshwater research. 

As well as the articles in this update, the following have been posted to our website:

Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems 

July's FWU includes water quality maps and information. 

Retrospective river flows, July to September 2011

What we predicted for July 2011 to September 2011

River flows are likely to be normal in the North Island and north of the South Island, and normal or below normal in the rest of the South Island. 

What actually happened during July 2011 to September 2011

River flows were normal to below normal for most of the country, with some above normal river flows in the eastern North Island, eastern Southland and coastal Otago. 

 

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All staff working on this subject

Hydro-ecological Modeller
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Freshwater Hydro-Ecologist
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Riparian and Wetland Scientist
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Land and Water Scientist
Assistant Regional Manager - Christchurch
Principal Scientist - Aquatic Pollution
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Hydrology Scientist
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Environmental Monitoring Technician
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Coastal Technician
Freshwater Fish Ecologist
Environmental Monitoring Technician
Hydrodynamics Scientist
Resource Management Scientist
Regional Manager - Auckland
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Environmental Scientist
Algal Ecologist
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