Oceanography

Latest news

A six-metre long orange underwater robot is flying through the Kaikōura Canyon for the next month collecting information on how the canyon has changed since the 2016 earthquake.
After 75 nights at sea all the temporary master of NIWA research vessel Kaharoa could think about today was getting off the ship and having a beer.
At the bottom of the Southern Ocean, near Cape Adare in East Antarctica, lies an undersea ridge which until this month was only known by its co-ordinates: -71.2132 latitude, 172.1649 longitude.
Coronavirus border restrictions mean six NIWA staff face four straight months at sea in a bid to keep an international ocean research project afloat.

Our work

NIWA is conducting a five–year study to map changes in the distribution of plankton species in surface waters between New Zealand and the Ross Sea.
Our oceans are expected to become more acidic as carbon dioxide concentrations rise. This will likely have impacts on the plankton, which play a major role in ocean ecosystems and processes.

Latest videos

Exploring the deepsea

Despite many centuries of maritime exploration, only a fraction of our planet's seafloor has been observed. NIWA Deepsea Scientist Di Tracey tells us what it feels like to probe deep beneath the waves to see what's living on the ocean floor.

Shifting Sands - Tsunami hazard off Kaikoura, NZ

Dr Joshu Mountjoy discusses NIWA's work in assessing the tsunami hazard just south of Kaikoura. 

Find out more about this research. 

NIWA answers a wide range of scientific questions using ocean modelling. These models can be linked to well established weather forecasting models to predict ocean temperature, sea level and the dispersal of pollution.
Ocean water properties such as temperature are measured directly, while conductivity is used to tell us the salinity. It also captures water samples at different depths for a variety of chemical and biological measurements made either on the vessel or back in the laboratory.

Welcome to this special edition of Coasts Update, highlighting the Shallow Survey 2012.

Shallow Survey 2012

30 August 2011 to 31 August 2011

Abstracts submission for the 6th internation Shallow Water survey conference are due on Wednesday 30th August. This conference will explore the latest developments in shallow water surveying.
 
Follow this link for more information and to submit abstracts.

The return of the upgraded RV Tangaroa represents a huge advancement for New Zealand science and exploration

NIWA today welcomed home RV Tangaroa, New Zealand’s only deepwater research vessel, after a $20 million dollar upgrade to enhance its ocean science and survey capabilities.

NIWA looks below Antarctic ice shelves to investigate the polar ocean system with a new high-tech probe.

Extreme Weather 2011

9 February 2011 to 11 February 2011

The conference will be held in Wellington, NZ and include six special sessions each with a keynote address:
Extreme weather in the Australasian region – from floods to droughts
Impact and meteorology of the main climate drivers (ENSO, SAM, Monsoon)
Using high resolution models to understand local meteorology
Oceanography of the Australasian region
Climate change in the Australasian region
Impacts of natural catastrophes in the Australasian region
However papers on any topic related to the Atmospheric Sciences (including composition) and Oceanography of the Australasian region will be co

Two New Zealand research organisations will work closely with one of the world’s leading ocean research and engineering organisations to accelerate research and exploration in a wide range of oceanographic topics in the southwest Pacific region.

Scientists at NIWA have identified the source of the giant plankton bloom featuring in spectacular NASA satellite images.

Ocean acidification is the name given to the lowering of pH of the oceans as a result of increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere.

Three new posters of the Cook Strait and Wellington Harbour seabed reveal for the first time a treasure trove of detailed information for the benefit of all New Zealanders.

NIWA and IBM today announced a multi-million dollar partnership where NIWA will purchase one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers for use in environmental forecasting.

Our oceans are expected to become more acidic as carbon dioxide concentrations rise. This will likely have impacts on the plankton, which play a major role in ocean ecosystems and processes.
NIWA is conducting a five–year study to map changes in the distribution of plankton species in surface waters between New Zealand and the Ross Sea.

Inshore and onshore biodiversity sampling activity is about to commence in the Bay of Islands as the Bay of Islands Ocean Survey 20/20 project enters its next phase.

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All staff working on this subject

Principal Scientist - Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes
Marine Mammal Acoustician
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Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes Scientist
Fisheries Acoustics Scientist
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Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) Numerical Modeller
General Manager - Operations
Principal Scientist - Fisheries
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Marine Physics Modeller
Principal Scientist - Marine Physics
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Physical Oceanographer
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Coastal Technician
Algal Ecologist
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