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A new study has identified seven freshwater species native to Aotearoa-New Zealand that will likely be highly or very highly vulnerable to climate change.
It has been a whirlwind first six months for Ngāpera Keegan and Tekiteora Rolleston-Gabel, the first two young researchers in NIWA’s newly established Māori Graduate Internship Programme.
Two Māori carvers head to Antarctica next week to complete and install a traditional carving at Scott Base, New Zealand’s headquarters on the ice.
The diary and hand-drawn maps of a nineteenth century geologist has enabled NIWA scientists to confirm the former site of the iconic Pink and White Terraces at Lake Rotomahana.

Our work

A four-year research programme focused on the co-management and restoration of our freshwater taonga species wraps up this year.
Three plants of an endemic submerged quillwort (Isoëtes) were recovered from Lake Ōmāpere by NIWA in 1998, prior to the lake weed (Egeria densa) dying off and the lake switching into an algal dominated turbid state. No further isoëtes plants have been observed in the lake since that time.
Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and NIWA worked collaboratively during 2018-19 to support Ngāti Maniapoto whānau to reconnect with and participate in the assessment of their freshwater according to their values.

Latest videos

We are NIWA, Taihoro Nukurangi

Te Kūwaha, NIWA’s National Centre for Māori Environmental Research is a dedicated Māori research team, with a vision to work in partnership with others to enable complementary knowledge systems to support kaitiakitanga and provide environmental research excellence that enhances the social, environmental and economic aspirations of whānau, hapū and iwi, Maori communities and Maori business.

Tracing tsunamis through history
Weaving whakapapa and science together to trace tsunami through history.
A new study has identified seven freshwater species native to Aotearoa-New Zealand that will likely be highly or very highly vulnerable to climate change.
We are NIWA, Taihoro Nukurangi

Te Kūwaha, NIWA’s National Centre for Māori Environmental Research is a dedicated Māori research team, with a vision to work in partnership with others to enable complementary knowledge systems to support kaitiakitanga and provide environmental research excellence that enhances the social, environmental and economic aspirations of whānau, hapū and iwi, Maori communities and Maori business.

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and NIWA worked collaboratively during 2018-19 to support Ngāti Maniapoto whānau to reconnect with and participate in the assessment of their freshwater according to their values.
To prepare for changes in climate, our freshwater and oceans decision-makers need information on species vulnerability to climate change.
It has been a whirlwind first six months for Ngāpera Keegan and Tekiteora Rolleston-Gabel, the first two young researchers in NIWA’s newly established Māori Graduate Internship Programme.
NIWA, through the MBIE-funded Cultural Keystone Species programme (2016-2020), have developed a series of iwi engagement booklets sharing science knowledge to support species management strategy
A four-year research programme focused on the co-management and restoration of our freshwater taonga species wraps up this year.
Tracing tsunamis through history
Weaving whakapapa and science together to trace tsunami through history.

Freshwater Update 80 brings you the latest information from our Freshwater & Estuaries Centre, with articles that cross a broad spectrum of freshwater research. This edition has articles about the sources of plastics in our waterways, the discovery of long-lost lake plant species and a breakthrough in research about freshwater mussels/kākahi.

Two Māori carvers head to Antarctica next week to complete and install a traditional carving at Scott Base, New Zealand’s headquarters on the ice.
The diary and hand-drawn maps of a nineteenth century geologist has enabled NIWA scientists to confirm the former site of the iconic Pink and White Terraces at Lake Rotomahana.
Te Huringa ki te Rangi is a decision-making model to support indigenous and coastal communities who are grappling to understand and evaluate climate change impacts and risks, and how to integrate these into their development plans for the future.
Local hapū and NIWA are working together to find out more about juvenile freshwater eels or tuna in streams connecting to the Wairua River in the Wairoa catchment in Northland.
Erica Williams' story starts with the website of Moerewa School, where pupil Tyra-Lee explains her connection to a very special place in her small Far North town.
Iwi has joined forces with councils and NIWA to restore an estuarine ecosystem to its former health.
NIWA is working alongside Māori to develop gateways to science and technology partnerships that are helping grow the Māori economy.
When you’ve spent a long time viewing something a particular way, it’s hard to recognise when it changes.
Three plants of an endemic submerged quillwort (Isoëtes) were recovered from Lake Ōmāpere by NIWA in 1998, prior to the lake weed (Egeria densa) dying off and the lake switching into an algal dominated turbid state. No further isoëtes plants have been observed in the lake since that time.
There are a number of nationally available resources for the New Zealand public, institutions and companies who need access to well-maintained long-term data repositories. Some of these resources are listed here.
Instream structures such as hydroelectric dams may act as barriers to fish migration, and have the ability to alter the ecological connectivity of freshwater environments.

As eels only spawn once before death, they require different management to other fish.

On a global scale, market demand for eels as a foodstuff is high and declines in wild eel production mean that aquaculture is being put forward as a potential provider.

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All staff working on this subject

Regional Manager - Nelson
Principal Scientist - Aquatic Pollution
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Environmental Scientist
Environmental Research/Science Communication
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