Lakes

Latest news

A new study has identified seven freshwater species native to Aotearoa-New Zealand that will likely be highly or very highly vulnerable to climate change.
For more than 20 years NIWA scientists have been nurturing three plants that are the only examples of their kind in existence.
Scientists know so little about how storms affect the delicate balance of lake ecosystems that we may be unable to protect them from the effects of climate change, says a NIWA scientist.
Visitors to NIWA’s stand at this year’s Fieldays are invited to go diving into the Rotorua lakes—without having to get wet.

Our work

The ability to properly manage our freshwater resources requires a solid understanding of the flora and fauna which live in and interact with them.
Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and NIWA worked collaboratively during 2018-19 to support Ngāti Maniapoto whānau to reconnect with and participate in the assessment of their freshwater according to their values.
This research project aimed to understand the causes behind differences in mercury in trout and other organisms in the Bay of Plenty/Te Arawa lakes—in particular what features of each lake explain why mercury in trout is higher in some lakes than in other lakes.

NIWA recently hosted visitors from Northland to view cultivated plants from Lake Ōmāpere that are now ‘extinct in the wild’, and discussed plans for their reintroduction to the lake in the future. 

Latest videos

Diving deep to check up on our lakes

NIWA scientists jump overboard to check out the health the Rotorua Te Arawa lakes. The work is part of NIWA's national LakeSPI programme—an ecological health check for lakes throughout New Zealand. 
Underwater research to protect and maintain New Zealand's freshwater resources.

When deployed underwater, this self-contained instrument records and analyses water waves. It can trigger other instruments and send alarms via a communications link.

Modelling future water quality in Lake Benmore

The lakes of the Upper Waitaki Basin – Lakes Benmore, Aviemore, and Waitaki – are highly valued for their clean water. But land use is intensifying in the lakes’ catchments, and concerns for future water quality are growing. NIWA scientists have worked alongside Waikato University scientists to model  the potential impact of intensifying land use on water quality in Lake Benmore, to help Environment Canterbury with its regional planning.

World first in bio-crude oil research

“The reality is that no one in the world has done anything on this scale. Our trial aims to show that this complete process can be cost-effective and efficient”, says NIWA scientist Dr Rupert Craggs. Twelve years of research by NIWA’s Aquatic Pollution Group has culminated in the world’s first large-scale trial of the production of algal bio-crude oil from wastewater.

A regular newsletter that includes a seasonal review and outlook for New Zealand's water resources, and an update on some of NIWA's freshwater and estuaries research.

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All staff working on this subject

Principal Scientist - Aquatic Pollution
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Environmental Monitoring Technician
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Freshwater Ecologist
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Coastal Technician
Freshwater Fish Ecologist
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Environmental Scientist
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