Instrumentation

Latest news

A buoy with the ability to “phone home” has been deployed in Wellington Harbour today to monitor currents, waves and water quality in the harbour.
NIWA researchers have spent part of the last month keeping a close eye on the bottom of Lake Tekapo to find out what it looks like and what is going on below the lake bed.
NIWA’s Fieldays team is basking in the glory of winning the Best Indoor Agribusiness Site awarded by the National Agricultural Fieldays organisation for the 2015 event.
A World Meteorological Organisation panel has confirmed a finding that a temperature of -25.6°C observed at Eweburn, Ranfurly in New Zealand on 17 July 1903 is the coldest temperature recorded for the Southwest Pacific Region.

Our work

Climate Present and Past is a core-funded project under NIWA's National Climate Centre. It aims to explore historical climate data and track past changes in climate through a range of approaches.

Latest videos

ARGO - measuring salinity and temperature across the oceans
Since the early 2000s, NIWA has been part of the international Argo programme. Argo floats takes the pulse of the oceans, collecting and distributing temperature and salinity observations from a global network of more than 3700 underwater robots.
Exploring the deepsea

Despite many centuries of maritime exploration, only a fraction of our planet's seafloor has been observed. NIWA Deepsea Scientist Di Tracey tells us what it feels like to probe deep beneath the waves to see what's living on the ocean floor.

NIWA IrriMet
NIWA has developed new tools that can help farmers decide when to irrigate or fertilise.
We investigate; the impact of Christchurch's M7.1 earthquake on a groundwater monitoring bore, how our irrigation monitoring and control work can help you meet your irrigation consent requirements and how we make harbour tides and currents visible.
In this issue we show how we are using technology to help improve weather monitoring in Fiji, manage climate threats and opportunities in Samoa, find ways to reduce pollutants from domestic wood-burners and understand contaminant loads in dairy farm runoff.

NIWA scientists have been at work all weekend measuring the height of the volcanic ash clouds as they approached and passed over Lauder, in Central Otago. This work has been done to support predictions about the ash cloud and its effects.

A rugged dissolved oxygen sensor, ideal for continuous monitoring, with excellent long-term stability and requiring little maintenance.

SDI Explorer is a diagnostic tool which turns your PC screen into a ‘window’ that allows you to observe the data traffic on an SDI-12 communications bus.

This precision battery-powered logging instrument takes long-term unattended readings of water level in bores and wells.

These provide a complete self-contained measurement and recording system, for long-term data collection at remote sites, and options for remote telemetry.

These submersible pressure sensors, with an accuracy of 0.1% and stability of 0.2% per annum, are suitable for long-term monitoring of bores, rivers and lakes. Both are compatible with analog input data loggers.

NIWA has built flow stations on rivers and canals for decades. While technology has changed over the years, we've still achieved a high level of standardization.

These large propeller type meters are supplied with one propeller for flows up to 6.0 m/s. They are rugged, easy to use and suitable for flood gauging.

These small propeller type meters are supplied with two propellers, one for very low flows (up to 0.3 m/s) and another for higher flows (up to 2.0 m/s) .

A versatile bucket wheel water current meter good for measuring very low flows. It has a tail fin, to allow cable gauging, so can't operate in water as shallow as the Pygmy.

This small bucket wheel current meter has a very low starting velocity and no tail fin, so is ideal for measuring very low flows in shallow water.

This Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) can accurately measure the velocity of rivers, streams, estuaries, channels, ports and harbours, across a channel up to 300 meters wide.

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All staff working on this subject

Principal Scientist - Atmosphere
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Fisheries Acoustics Scientist
Principal Scientist - Marine Physics
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Physical Oceanographer
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National Projects Manager
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Environmental Monitoring Technician
Environmental Monitoring Technician
Regional Manager - Wellington
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