Instrumentation

Latest news

For a small group of unassuming buildings nestled amongst the wide-open spaces of the Maniototo, the Lauder Atmospheric Research Station punches well above its weight.
The prodigious rainmaker that hit Canterbury earlier this month saw NIWA field teams out in the elements collecting flood data from bridges, cableways and jetboat gaugings.
Once a year, technicians from NIWA’s North Island Field Team don helmets and head lamps to check a network of CO2 sensors in the world-renowned Waitomo Caves. The sensors help make sure that heavy breathing visitors aren’t wrecking the caves’ precious natural structures and microclimate.
After 75 nights at sea all the temporary master of NIWA research vessel Kaharoa could think about today was getting off the ship and having a beer.

Our work

Climate Present and Past is a core-funded project under NIWA's National Climate Centre. It aims to explore historical climate data and track past changes in climate through a range of approaches.

Latest videos

NIWA's Sarah Searson and Jennie Mowatt
If you want to get accurate scientific readings from the icy depths of the Ross Sea, who do you turn to?
Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle helps scientists collect data
Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle helping scientists collect the latest earthquake data
ARGO - measuring salinity and temperature across the oceans
Since the early 2000s, NIWA has been part of the international Argo programme. Argo floats takes the pulse of the oceans, collecting and distributing temperature and salinity observations from a global network of more than 3700 underwater robots.
Exploring the deepsea

Despite many centuries of maritime exploration, only a fraction of our planet's seafloor has been observed. NIWA Deepsea Scientist Di Tracey tells us what it feels like to probe deep beneath the waves to see what's living on the ocean floor.

NIWA's Sarah Searson and Jennie Mowatt
If you want to get accurate scientific readings from the icy depths of the Ross Sea, who do you turn to?
For a small group of unassuming buildings nestled amongst the wide-open spaces of the Maniototo, the Lauder Atmospheric Research Station punches well above its weight.
The prodigious rainmaker that hit Canterbury earlier this month saw NIWA field teams out in the elements collecting flood data from bridges, cableways and jetboat gaugings.
Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle helps scientists collect data
Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle helping scientists collect the latest earthquake data
Once a year, technicians from NIWA’s North Island Field Team don helmets and head lamps to check a network of CO2 sensors in the world-renowned Waitomo Caves. The sensors help make sure that heavy breathing visitors aren’t wrecking the caves’ precious natural structures and microclimate.
After 75 nights at sea all the temporary master of NIWA research vessel Kaharoa could think about today was getting off the ship and having a beer.
NIWA scientists have set up air quality sensors every 100 metres across Arrowtown in what is believed to be the world’s densest air monitoring network.

In the last few days our microbial team has been doing intensive sampling of the water column using the CTD, which is deployed every day around noon.

A buoy with the ability to “phone home” has been deployed in Wellington Harbour today to monitor currents, waves and water quality in the harbour.
ARGO - measuring salinity and temperature across the oceans
Since the early 2000s, NIWA has been part of the international Argo programme. Argo floats takes the pulse of the oceans, collecting and distributing temperature and salinity observations from a global network of more than 3700 underwater robots.
Exploring the deepsea

Despite many centuries of maritime exploration, only a fraction of our planet's seafloor has been observed. NIWA Deepsea Scientist Di Tracey tells us what it feels like to probe deep beneath the waves to see what's living on the ocean floor.

NIWA researchers have spent part of the last month keeping a close eye on the bottom of Lake Tekapo to find out what it looks like and what is going on below the lake bed.
In this issue: NIWA has designed, supplied and installed a complex web-enabled automatic control system, comprised of nearly 60 control stations, and software to manage the water distribution across Rangitata South Irrigation (RSI); Technologists, researchers, farmers, regulators and irrigation scheme operators are jointly evolving a water use strategy for Canterbury; Rain and irrigation water can transport fertilizer, farm chemicals, animal waste and pathogens to unknown destinations underground, in various proportions and concentrations.
NIWA’s Fieldays team is basking in the glory of winning the Best Indoor Agribusiness Site awarded by the National Agricultural Fieldays organisation for the 2015 event.
NIWA IrriMet
NIWA has developed new tools that can help farmers decide when to irrigate or fertilise.
Climate Present and Past is a core-funded project under NIWA's National Climate Centre. It aims to explore historical climate data and track past changes in climate through a range of approaches.
A World Meteorological Organisation panel has confirmed a finding that a temperature of -25.6°C observed at Eweburn, Ranfurly in New Zealand on 17 July 1903 is the coldest temperature recorded for the Southwest Pacific Region.

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All staff working on this subject

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Principal Technician - Marine Ecology
Principal Scientist - Atmosphere
Emeritus Researcher – Atmospheric Radiation
Principal Scientist - Marine Physics
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Physical Oceanographer
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National Projects Manager - Business Operations
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Environmental Monitoring Technician
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Coastal Technician
Environmental Monitoring Technician
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Atmospheric Technician
Regional Manager - Wellington
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