Hydrology

Latest news

If you think science and art have nothing in common, think again. At environmental science institute NIWA, it’s all about one inspiring the other.
Now back on dry land, Voyage Leader Richard O'Driscoll reflects on the final days of RV Tangaroa's 2015 Antarctica expedition.

The New Zealand Hydrological Society Conference takes place in Nelson this week. The theme for the conference is "Water: Know your limits". Water conservation and management is a hot topic.

NIWA and IBM today announced a multi-million dollar partnership where NIWA will purchase one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers for use in environmental forecasting.

Our work

This project examines how best to manage and plan for climate-related opportunities and risks in the electricity system.
NIWA is developing a national river flow forecasting tool for New Zealand that aims to support and strengthen our planning for and response to extreme rainfall events.
Currently there are gaps in understanding of user decision making processes and public needs and requirements for river forecasting in New Zealand. This project aims to bridge NIWA river forecasting aspirations and capabilities with both the public and decision makers’ requirements.
Bringing together leading scientific organisations and regional councils, this project develops a sophisticated computer modelling framework that will enable users to accurately predict how much freshwater is available, where it has come from, and how quickly it moves in New Zealand catchments.

Latest videos

Hydrology Sounds Interesting 2011

The December 2018 New Zealand combined Hydrological and Meteorological Society conference called for a new category of presentation that was short, interesting and artistic. Dr Graeme Smart (NIWA Principal Scientist - Natural Hazards and Hydrodynamics) - took time series of Canterbury hydrologic variables during February 2011 and played these as an orchestral score.

NIWA is developing a national river flow forecasting tool for New Zealand that aims to support and strengthen our planning for and response to extreme rainfall events.
NIWA has established a network of 11 high elevation meteorological stations aiming to gather information about the amount, extent, seasonal nature and long-term change to snow and ice in alpine regions of New Zealand.

Freshwater Update 80 brings you the latest information from our Freshwater & Estuaries Centre, with articles that cross a broad spectrum of freshwater research. This edition has articles about the sources of plastics in our waterways, the discovery of long-lost lake plant species and a breakthrough in research about freshwater mussels/kākahi.

If you think science and art have nothing in common, think again. At environmental science institute NIWA, it’s all about one inspiring the other.
Hydrology Sounds Interesting 2011

The December 2018 New Zealand combined Hydrological and Meteorological Society conference called for a new category of presentation that was short, interesting and artistic. Dr Graeme Smart (NIWA Principal Scientist - Natural Hazards and Hydrodynamics) - took time series of Canterbury hydrologic variables during February 2011 and played these as an orchestral score.

Previous research has identified significant unintended water loss (surface runoff and groundwater recharge) on pallic soils, predominately on hillslopes, under spray irrigation.
Currently there are gaps in understanding of user decision making processes and public needs and requirements for river forecasting in New Zealand. This project aims to bridge NIWA river forecasting aspirations and capabilities with both the public and decision makers’ requirements.

Freshwater Update 79 brings you the latest information from our Freshwater & Estuaries Centre, with articles ranging from NIWA working with NASA; restoring a stream catchment in Kaikōura; looking after urban water; keeping soil and reducing sedimentation; to culling catfish.

NZWaM-Hydro is scalable, and the hydrological relationships in the model are transferable between locations.
Bringing together leading scientific organisations and regional councils, this project develops a sophisticated computer modelling framework that will enable users to accurately predict how much freshwater is available, where it has come from, and how quickly it moves in New Zealand catchments.

Compound Specific Stable Isotope tracing of sediment sources - tools to manage a sticky problem in New Zealand’s freshwaters and estuaries

Fine sediment is New Zealand’s most widespread water contaminant, degrading ecosystems, infilling dams and reservoirs and impairing recreational, cultural and aesthetic values in our rivers, estuaries and coastal seas.
Now back on dry land, Voyage Leader Richard O'Driscoll reflects on the final days of RV Tangaroa's 2015 Antarctica expedition.

The Hydrological Society & The Meteorological Society of NZ joint conference

19 November 2013 to 22 November 2013

NIWA is sponsoring The Hydrological Society & The Meteorological Society of NZ joint conference

The theme of this year’s conference is Water and Weather: Solutions for health, wealth and environment.

The conference is being held in Palmerston North, and will attract scientists, technicians, consultants, hydrologists, climatologists, students, resource managers and many others. 

Welcome to Freshwater Update 57, with the latest info from our Freshwater and Estuaries centre.

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