Flood

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New NIWA-led research shows increasing flood risk is going to be what leads people to make changes to adapt to sea-level rise.
Flood flows on the Buller River this month were the largest of any river in Aotearoa New Zealand in almost 100 years, NIWA measurements show.
Preliminary analysis by NIWA climate scientists has shown that the recent Canterbury rainfall was so extreme in some inland places that it could be expected to happen only once every 200 years.
The prodigious rainmaker that hit Canterbury earlier this month saw NIWA field teams out in the elements collecting flood data from bridges, cableways and jetboat gaugings.

Our work

Flooding is one of the most costly natural hazards in Aotearoa New Zealand. Our regular flood clean-up bills are topped only by much less frequent earthquakes.

Latest videos

NIWA 2017 Annual Climate Summary

Chris Brandolino (Principal Scientist - Forecasting) presents the 2017 Annual Climate Summary. See the detailed Annual Climate Summary.

Edgecumbe Flood Damage

NIWA and GNS scientists recently visited Edgecumbe to assess flood damage in the area. In this video, local residents show the flood impacts on property, and hazards engineer Kate Crowley talks about flood scenario research.

Welcome to Freshwater Update 54. This issue features some of the latest work from our Freshwater and Estuaries teams, Water Quality maps and information and  River flow maps for Autumn.

Latest news from the centre includes: Float your boat! Scientists use hi-tech miniature Q-boat to measure river flows 

Welcome to Freshwater Update for May 2012.

This issue contains news about work from NIWA's Freshwater team, and Water Quality maps and information for the period January, February, March 2012.

As well as the articles below, the following have been added to our website:

Robot spies make new science discoveries in Fiordland's World Heritage Park

River floods occur when water spills from a river channel onto land that is normally dry, and are one of New Zealand's costliest natural hazards.
Heavy rainfall is one of the most frequent and widespread severe weather hazards to affect New Zealand. It is defined as rainfall greater than 100 mm in 24 hours.

Cyclone Yasi, which hit Australia in February, was a massive storm that destroyed hundreds of homes and devastated tropical rainforests. Understanding the risks posed by natural hazards like Cyclone Yasi, and how to mitigate their impact, is an important priority for New Zealand as extreme weather resulting in emergency situations can be expected to become more frequent. Our climate is becoming increasingly variable, while more people are living in coastal areas which are vulnerable to storms.

NIWA’s weather prediction model simulated the intense rainfall which fell just north of the capital, and flooded parts of Porirua, on Sunday 27 March. Thirty nine millimetres of rain fell in less than an hour, around 1.00pm.

Over the past decade, predicting the weather, and understanding the changes in climate, has emerged as one of the most important and topical areas of scientific endeavour.

NIWA scientists leave for Brisbane this Friday 28 January.

Stormwater 2011

3 May 2011 to 6 May 2011

The Stormwater Special Interest Group of Water NZ is holding the 7th South Pacific Stormwater Conference on the 3rd-6th May at the Sky City Convention Centre, Auckland, NZ.
The aim of the 2011 conference is to provide delegates with an opportunity to:

* Upskill in various areas of stormwater science and management
* Network with peers
* Hear new and cutting edge stormwater information

Suggested themes for sessions at the 2011 conference include:

* Low impact design and development
* Success in Stormwater management
* Climate change
* Stormwater and Public Health
* Catchment management

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