Ecosystems

Latest news

NIWA researchers are heading out from Tasman early next week to survey an area thought to be home to important juvenile fish nurseries.
Five specialist NIWA divers were left ‘gasping’ during their recent plunge under the ice near Scott Base.
NIWA’s flagship research vessel Tangaroa will sail out of Wellington Harbour on Sunday for the first scientific voyage since the lockdown.
Scientists mapping the Hauraki Gulf seafloor have discovered huge colonies of tubeworms up to 1.5 metres high and collectively covering hundreds of metres providing vital habitats for plants and animals.

Our work

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and NIWA worked collaboratively during 2018-19 to support Ngāti Maniapoto whānau to reconnect with and participate in the assessment of their freshwater according to their values.
The Whatawhata Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) Project is the longest continuously monitored before-after-control-impact (BACI) catchment-scale study in New Zealand.
NIWA hosted an IPBES workshop entitled “Visions for nature and nature’s contributions to people for the 21st century” held from 4-8 September 2017 in Auckland.
Seagrass beds form an important undersea habitat for small fish, seahorses and shellfish in New Zealand.

Latest videos

Taking the pulse of Antarctica’s ocean ecosystem
Niwa scientists have anchored an echosounder to the sea floor of Terra Nova Bay that could reveal the mystery of silverfish reproduction under the Antarctic ice.
Southern Blue Whiting Fishery

NIWA fisheries scientist Dr Stuart Hanchet describes the history and management of the southern blue whiting fishery, centred around New Zealand's subantarctic islands.

Kaikoura Canyon Seabed Life

The video represents a number of clips that have been spliced together to illustrate the abundant life associated with the muddy seabed sediments in Kaikoura Canyon at 1000m.

This project aims to increase our knowledge of aquatic ecosystems and their restoration, and apply this to degraded streams, rivers, lakes and estuaries.
Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and NIWA worked collaboratively during 2018-19 to support Ngāti Maniapoto whānau to reconnect with and participate in the assessment of their freshwater according to their values.
NIWA researchers are heading out from Tasman early next week to survey an area thought to be home to important juvenile fish nurseries.
Five specialist NIWA divers were left ‘gasping’ during their recent plunge under the ice near Scott Base.
These are some recent publications related to the freshwater species ecology and management programme.

The abundance and diversity of life in our rivers, lakes and estuaries is the ultimate indicator of the health and wellbeing of our aquatic ecosystems. NIWA is helping to ensure that New Zealand’s unique and iconic freshwater species are healthy, abundant and thriving.

Constructed wetlands are a water quality restoration tool that can reduce levels of sediment, nutrients and microbes such as E. coli.
The Whatawhata Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) Project is the longest continuously monitored before-after-control-impact (BACI) catchment-scale study in New Zealand.
NIWA’s flagship research vessel Tangaroa will sail out of Wellington Harbour on Sunday for the first scientific voyage since the lockdown.
Scientists mapping the Hauraki Gulf seafloor have discovered huge colonies of tubeworms up to 1.5 metres high and collectively covering hundreds of metres providing vital habitats for plants and animals.
Research shows how fish are being affected by microplastics.

Freshwater Update 81 brings you the latest information from our Freshwater & Estuaries Centre, with articles ranging from how NIWA scientists are solving the longfin eel migration mystery, how we're taking you diving with us at Fieldays, and a word from one of the editors of the new Lakes Restoration Handbook.

Christchurch’s Red Zone is to be the focal point of a scientific experiment involving street lights and insects over summer. 
NIWA hosted an IPBES workshop entitled “Visions for nature and nature’s contributions to people for the 21st century” held from 4-8 September 2017 in Auckland.
Atlantis is a 3D, spatially-explicit, trophodynamic ecosystem model that integrates biology, physics, chemistry and human impacts to provide a synoptic view of marine ecosystem function.
Unlike other ecosystem models, machine learning is built solely from the information it is presented.
Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) is trophodynamic modelling software that uses a mass-balance approach to describe ecosystem based, marine food web interactions.
Spatially explicit disturbance/recovery models are a cellular automaton that uses a mechanistic approach to investigate recovery rates of benthic species following disturbance events.

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All staff working on this subject

Hydro-ecological Modeller
Principal Scientist - Ecosystem Modelling
Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Population Modeller
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Marine Biogeochemistry Technician
Marine Mammal Acoustician
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Riparian and Wetland Scientist
Manager - Coasts and Oceans
Assistant Regional Manager - Christchurch
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Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Principal Scientist - Fisheries
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Marine Physics Modeller
Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Fisheries Acoustics Scientist
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Marine Biologist (Biosecurity)
Principal Scientist - Aquatic Pollution
Principal Scientist - Fisheries
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