Coasts

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Latest news

Jellyfish blooms are likely to be a common sight this summer with rising ocean temperatures one of the main causes of substantial population growths.
Small orange flecks spotted floating around in a respiration chamber at a NIWA laboratory have led to a discovery about the spawning habits of a deep-sea stony coral in New Zealand waters.
A six-metre long orange underwater robot is flying through the Kaikōura Canyon for the next month collecting information on how the canyon has changed since the 2016 earthquake.
People along the Kapiti and Wanganui coast may spot NIWA’s research vessel Kaharoa operating close to shore in the next few weeks as scientists carry out a survey of snapper, tarakihi, red gurnard and John Dory.

Our work

NIWA is looking for people who have had a long association with the Hauraki Gulf or Marlborough Sounds to help them with a research project on juvenile fish habitats.

NIWA is developing guidelines and advice to help coastal communities adapt to climate change.

Most of the plastic in the ocean originates on land, being carried to the estuaries and coasts by rivers. Managing this plastic on land before it reaches the river could be the key to stemming the tide of marine-bound plastics. The aim of this project is to understand the sources and fate of plastic pollution carried by urban rivers using the Kaiwharawhara Stream as a case study.
Seagrass beds form an important undersea habitat for small fish, seahorses and shellfish in New Zealand.

Latest videos

Shifting Sands - Tsunami hazard off Kaikoura, NZ

Dr Joshu Mountjoy discusses NIWA's work in assessing the tsunami hazard just south of Kaikoura. 

Find out more about this research. 

Antarctic Coastal Marine Life in a Changing Climate

NIWA marine ecologist Dr Vonda Cummings discusses the likely effects of climate change on marine invertebrates living on the seafloor of the Ross Sea coast.

Next Stop Antarctica

Our Far South is an expedition that aims to raise New Zealanders' awareness of the area south of Stewart Island. Gareth Morgan, Te Radar, scientists and 50 everyday Kiwis are onboard to learn and then share their experience. This is the first video produced by them, showing some of the highlights of the trip so far.

This analog output sensor provides accurate long-term measurements of water depth and temperature in bores, drains and rivers.

This ultrasonic Doppler instrument is a compact, easy to use system for measuring water flow in rivers, channels and pipes.

Uses a float and counterweight system to convert water level into an electronic output that can be read by a datalogger. Accurate to within a millimetre over a wide range.

This has 16 analog inputs with an accuracy of better than 0.1% of full scale. You can configure inputs as single ended or differential and select from four input signal ranges.

The Neon Applications software is a suite of software and documentation which allows clients to set up their own Neon system on existing server hardware, or new server hardware located at the client’s premises.

The NRT is a small self-contained unit which connects to sensors, records readings from them and transmits the data to a central server via satellite communications.

The NRT is a small self-contained unit which connects to sensors, records readings from them and transmits the data to a central server via a cellular telephone network.

Welcome to the latest edition of Coasts Update. Here we bring you news of some of NIWA's latest research on aspects of coastal ecology, and the possible impacts of climate change on one of our coastal communities.

A low-cost weather station for gathering accurate weather data. Wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure and rainfall data can be accessed from a server, via the internet.

This measures rain by the drop as well as by the tradional 'tip'. We can configure it either with an SDI12 serial data interface or an integral logger with cellular communications.

A self-contained telemetered inshore buoy capable of being equipped with a wide range of marine sensors.

Many of New Zealand's rivers fail to meet national guidelines for nutrient levels. NIWA has developed the Catchment Land Use & Environmental Sustainability (CLUES) estuary tool to predict the effects of land use on estuarine nutrient concentrations.

NIWA is developing guidelines and advice to help coastal communities adapt to climate change.

NIWA is working on a ministry-funded project to produce a model, validated by 40 years of historic data, to project future wave and storm surges off the coast for two climate change scenarios.

Here we provide a detailed summary of key outcomes from the Sustainable Aquaculture programme to 30 June 2009.

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All staff working on this subject

Principal Scientist - Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes
Principal Scientist - Ecosystem Modelling
Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
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Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes Scientist
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Coastal Adaptation Scientist
Regional Manager - Nelson
Hydrodynamics Scientist
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Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Senior Regional Manager - Wellington
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Marine Invertebrate Systematist
Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Fisheries Acoustics Scientist
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Physical Oceanographer
Principal Scientist - Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes
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