Climate and weather

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A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.

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This research project aims to establish connections between weather and river flow forecasting, inundation prediction, and the associated risks to people and assets, using the RiskScape platform.

Latest videos

Why was 2021 New Zealand’s warmest year on record?

It's official, 2021 was Aotearoa New Zealand’s warmest year on record. The year 2021 finished with an average temperature of 13.56°C in New Zealand, this was 0.95°C above average (relative to the 1981-2010 baseline) and surpassed 2016 to become the country's new warmest year on record. Read more at Annual Climate Summary 2021.

2022-23 Summer Climate Summary from Ben Noll

2022-23 Summer Climate Summary from NIWA Meteorologist/Forecaster Ben Noll. See all the numbers and facts for New Zealand's wild summer weather

Tropical Cyclone Outlook: November 2021-April 2022

The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 9 to 12 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2021 and April 2022. The seasonal outlook is for normal to slightly above normal activity in terms of overall named TCs in the region.

Tropical Cyclone Outlook: November 2020-April 2021

The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 8 to 10 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2020 and April 2021. This seasonal outlook is for normal to below normal activity in terms of overall named cyclone systems in the region. 

A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent. Regions experiencing significant soil moisture deficits are deemed “hotspots”. Persistent hotspot regions have the potential to develop into drought.
New Zealand’s warmest November on record.
New Zealand’s second-warmest spring on record
Summer temperatures are very likely to be above average across the country. Warm overnight temperatures and extended periods of high humidity are likely.
Coastal sea temperatures around Aotearoa New Zealand have risen well above average, NIWA forecasters say.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent. Regions experiencing significant soil moisture deficits are deemed “hotspots”. Persistent hotspot regions have the potential to develop into drought.
Tropical Cyclone Outlook: November 2021-April 2022

The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 9 to 12 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2021 and April 2022. The seasonal outlook is for normal to slightly above normal activity in terms of overall named TCs in the region.

A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent. Regions experiencing significant soil moisture deficits are deemed “hotspots”. Persistent hotspot regions have the potential to develop into drought.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent. Regions experiencing significant soil moisture deficits are deemed “hotspots”. Persistent hotspot regions have the potential to develop into drought.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central Pacific) during October was -0.59˚C. The latest weekly value was -0.80˚C, continuing the trend towards La Niña. The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) was +0.7 during October and August-October, on the La Niña side of neutral. Overall, this represented an ocean-atmosphere system that was on the verge of La Niña conditions.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent. Regions experiencing significant soil moisture deficits are deemed “hotspots”. Persistent hotspot regions have the potential to develop into drought.
5th-warmest October on record
Temperatures are very likely to be above average across Aotearoa New Zealand with a period of particularly warm conditions from around the second week of November.
The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 9 to 12 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2021 and April 2022. The seasonal outlook is for normal to slightly above normal activity in terms of overall named TCs in the region
New NIWA-led research shows increasing flood risk is going to be what leads people to make changes to adapt to sea-level rise.
A mild and wet September
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central Pacific) during September was -0.23˚C. Compared to this time last year, conditions are about 0.5˚C warmer. The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) was +0.8 during September, on the La Niña side of neutral. Notably, the three-month average SOI was +1.0, in La Niña territory.
Temperatures are very likely to be above average across New Zealand. More northeasterly winds are expected to cause periods of warmth and humidity, such as in early October.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central Pacific) during August was -0.17 ̊C. The Southern Oscillation Index was +0.5. While both remained in neutral territory, other indicators trended toward La Niña.
New Zealand’s second consecutive warmest winter on record
A warm finish to winter for most of the country
Aotearoa New Zealand has just experienced its warmest winter on record – well exceeding the previous record which was set just last year.
Spring rainfall is most likely to be below normal in the east of the North Island, near normal in the west of the South Island, and about equally likely to be near normal or below normal in all remaining regions across Aotearoa New Zealand.
A record-equalling top temperature of 23ᵒC in Akaroa on Tuesday prompted a feeling of déjà vu for NIWA forecaster Ben Noll.
A closer eye is now being kept on Stewart Island’s climate thanks to the installation of a new electronic weather station.

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Atmospheric Modeller
Emeritus Researcher – Atmospheric Radiation
Principal Scientist - Carbon Chemistry and Modelling
Principal Scientist - Atmosphere and Climate
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Principal Scientist - Research Software Engineering
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NWP/CFD Modeller and Analyst
Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes Scientist
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Marine Physics Modeller
Principal Scientist - Marine Physics
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Scientist
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Physical Oceanographer
Chief Scientist - Climate, Atmosphere and Hazards
Atmospheric Scientist
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Atmospheric Technician
Maori Organisational Development Manager
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Principal Technician - Climate and Risk Applications Developer
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