Climate and weather

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A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.
A weekly update describing soil moisture patterns across the country to show where dry to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent.

Our work

This research project aims to establish connections between weather and river flow forecasting, inundation prediction, and the associated risks to people and assets, using the RiskScape platform.

Latest videos

Why was 2021 New Zealand’s warmest year on record?

It's official, 2021 was Aotearoa New Zealand’s warmest year on record. The year 2021 finished with an average temperature of 13.56°C in New Zealand, this was 0.95°C above average (relative to the 1981-2010 baseline) and surpassed 2016 to become the country's new warmest year on record. Read more at Annual Climate Summary 2021.

2022-23 Summer Climate Summary from Ben Noll

2022-23 Summer Climate Summary from NIWA Meteorologist/Forecaster Ben Noll. See all the numbers and facts for New Zealand's wild summer weather

Tropical Cyclone Outlook: November 2021-April 2022

The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 9 to 12 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2021 and April 2022. The seasonal outlook is for normal to slightly above normal activity in terms of overall named TCs in the region.

Tropical Cyclone Outlook: November 2020-April 2021

The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 8 to 10 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2020 and April 2021. This seasonal outlook is for normal to below normal activity in terms of overall named cyclone systems in the region. 

Building on their knowledge of the local climate and any recent events, students explore predicted impacts of climate change.
As ‘climate journalists’, students will research a recent significant local or national climate related event.
In this activity, students will determine the potential personal impacts of climate change on things that are important to them.
In this lesson, you will play NIWA’s online serious game, My coastal futures.
This page outlines specific learning intentions, success criteria and key climate change background knowledge for these teaching resources.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central equatorial Pacific) over the last month (through 31 August) was -1.00˚C (climatology: 1991-2020), showing a strong cooling trend compared to July. In the last four decades, only four Augusts had cooler central equatorial Pacific SSTs than 2022, including August 2010, 1999, 1998, and 1988.
Resources to help teach climate adaptation aimed at approximate Year 7-10 students. Includes online game, My coastal futures, and NIWA's climate adaptation toolbox and linked activities.
Heavy rain, flooding, and New Zealand’s 2nd-warmest August
New Zealand’s warmest and wettest winter on record.
La Niña, which restrengthened during August, is expected to be an important climate driver for Aotearoa New Zealand during spring.
NIWA scientists are monitoring the potential for another marine heatwave in New Zealand’s coastal waters this coming summer.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central equatorial Pacific) over the last month (through 31 July) was -0.34˚C (climatology: 1961-1990); the latest weekly anomaly was -0.43˚C, showing a late-month cooling trend.
Around New Zealand, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) ranged from 0.5˚C to 1.3˚C above average during July, a decrease compared to June. SSTs are forecast to remain above average into spring, which will have an upward influence on air temperatures.
NIWA and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are working together to develop a new drought forecasting tool.
New Zealand’s weather is proving no exception to the record-breaking extremes occurring around the globe.
Forecasting sea surface temperatures several months in advance is challenging. To give us insights into what might happen around Aotearoa New Zealand in the months to come, NIWA scientists have combined predictions from eight different climate models from institutes around the world.
A warm month, wet in the west but dry in the east
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central equatorial Pacific) over the last month was -0.40˚C, in the “cool-neutral range”. The three-monthly NINO3.4 Index remained near the La Niña threshold.
Temperatures are most likely to be warmer than average across all regions of Aotearoa New Zealand. While cold snaps and frosts will occur, their duration and/or frequency may be reduced due to a lack of southerly air flows.
NIWA meteorologists say people living in the lower North Island and eastern South Island are likely to get the best views of the Matariki star cluster during the upcoming weekend.
The Tongan volcanic eruption may be responsible for New Zealand’s unusually vibrant sunrises and sunsets, say NIWA scientists.
Have a look at what might happen around Aotearoa New Zealand in the months to come. Our simulations extend six months into the future.
A new tool giving near real-time snow data has been made available to the public for the first time.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly over the last month (to 5 June) was 0.71˚C, near the La Niña threshold and a slight decrease compared to April.
New Zealand’s equal-second warmest autumn on record

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All staff working on this subject

Atmospheric Modeller
Emeritus Researcher – Atmospheric Radiation
Principal Scientist - Carbon Chemistry and Modelling
Principal Scientist - Atmosphere and Climate
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Principal Scientist - Research Software Engineering
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NWP/CFD Modeller and Analyst
Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes Scientist
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Marine Physics Modeller
Principal Scientist - Marine Physics
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Scientist
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Physical Oceanographer
Chief Scientist - Climate, Atmosphere and Hazards
Atmospheric Scientist
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Atmospheric Technician
Maori Organisational Development Manager
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Principal Technician - Climate and Risk Applications Developer
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