Climate

Latest news

New NIWA-led research shows increasing flood risk is going to be what leads people to make changes to adapt to sea-level rise.
Aotearoa New Zealand has just experienced its warmest winter on record – well exceeding the previous record which was set just last year.
A record-equalling top temperature of 23ᵒC in Akaroa on Tuesday prompted a feeling of déjà vu for NIWA forecaster Ben Noll.
A closer eye is now being kept on Stewart Island’s climate thanks to the installation of a new electronic weather station.

Our work

NIWA is leading a New Zealand partnership to map the South and West Pacific Ocean's seabed as part of a worldwide initiative to map the entire globe’s seafloor.
Clouds over the ocean, and how they trap or emit radiation from the sun, are partly influenced by the biology, biogeochemistry and physics of the surface ocean below.
NIWA’s research into forecasting weather systems aims to increase the resilience of New Zealand communities to weather-related hazards.
Our Future Climate New Zealand is an interactive website that lets you to look at projections for a number of climate variables for New Zealand between now and 2100.

Latest videos

Glacier melt: A Time Capsule

Since 2016 enough ice has melted from the South Island’s Brewster Glacier to meet the drinking water needs of all New Zealanders for three years.

Tropical Cyclone Outlook: November 2020-April 2021

The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 8 to 10 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2020 and April 2021. This seasonal outlook is for normal to below normal activity in terms of overall named cyclone systems in the region. 

2019 New Zealand Climate Summary
NIWA climate scientist Nava Fedaeff presents the NIWA annual climate summary for New Zealand 2019.
Glacier melt: A Time Capsule

Since 2016 enough ice has melted from the South Island’s Brewster Glacier to meet the drinking water needs of all New Zealanders for three years.

The NIWA and MetService assessment of named tropical cyclone (TC) activity indicates 9 to 12 named TCs could occur in the Southwest Pacific basin between November 2021 and April 2022. The seasonal outlook is for normal to slightly above normal activity in terms of overall named TCs in the region
New NIWA-led research shows increasing flood risk is going to be what leads people to make changes to adapt to sea-level rise.
A mild and wet September
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central Pacific) during September was -0.23˚C. Compared to this time last year, conditions are about 0.5˚C warmer. The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) was +0.8 during September, on the La Niña side of neutral. Notably, the three-month average SOI was +1.0, in La Niña territory.
Temperatures are very likely to be above average across New Zealand. More northeasterly winds are expected to cause periods of warmth and humidity, such as in early October.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central Pacific) during August was -0.17 ̊C. The Southern Oscillation Index was +0.5. While both remained in neutral territory, other indicators trended toward La Niña.
New Zealand’s second consecutive warmest winter on record
A warm finish to winter for most of the country
Aotearoa New Zealand has just experienced its warmest winter on record – well exceeding the previous record which was set just last year.
Spring rainfall is most likely to be below normal in the east of the North Island, near normal in the west of the South Island, and about equally likely to be near normal or below normal in all remaining regions across Aotearoa New Zealand.
A record-equalling top temperature of 23ᵒC in Akaroa on Tuesday prompted a feeling of déjà vu for NIWA forecaster Ben Noll.
A closer eye is now being kept on Stewart Island’s climate thanks to the installation of a new electronic weather station.
Without the global CFC ban we’d already be facing the reality of a “scorched earth”, according to researchers measuring the impact of the Montreal Protocol.
New Zealand has just experienced its warmest June and July since records began in 1909 and – with one month to go - is on track for its second successive warmest winter on record.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central Pacific) during July was 0.08 ̊C. The Southern Oscillation Index was +1.7, firmly in La Niña territory.
Heavy downpours and unseasonable warmth
Temperatures are most likely to be above average in all regions of the country. More northwesterly air flows will likely cause spells of unseasonably warm temperatures in the north and east of both islands in particular.
The NINO3.4 Index anomaly (in the central Pacific) during June was 0.18 ̊C, the first time it has been positive since July 2020. The Southern Oscillation Index was +0.4, in the ENSO neutral range.
A NIWA climate scientist has combined work and a sporting interest to benefit golfers throughout New Zealand.
New Zealand’s warmest June on record
NIWA climate scientists are redefining what’s normal when it comes to the weather.
NZ’s weather patterns are expected to feature substantial week-to-week variability over the coming months, owing to an ENSO neutral state in the tropical Pacific Ocean.
A weather roller coaster is coming to town and country before the end of the month.
Preliminary analysis by NIWA climate scientists has shown that the recent Canterbury rainfall was so extreme in some inland places that it could be expected to happen only once every 200 years.

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