Benthic habitats

Latest news

High-resolution mapping has produced the first ever global estimates of coastal habitat damage caused by anchoring.
Greater Wellington Regional Council regularly assess sediment quality and seafloor community health in the subtidal areas of Te Awarua-o-Porirua (Porirua Harbour) and Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington Harbour).
Scientists mapping the Hauraki Gulf seafloor have discovered huge colonies of tubeworms up to 1.5 metres high and collectively covering hundreds of metres providing vital habitats for plants and animals.
The findings of the most complex underwater coastal survey of the seafloor undertaken in New Zealand, including previously undiscovered natural features and sunken boats, are to be formally presented to the Marlborough community tomorrow.

Our work

Seagrass beds form an important undersea habitat for small fish, seahorses and shellfish in New Zealand.
New Zealand's Kaikoura Canyon is a 'biodiversity hotspot', containing far more life than seen before at such depths.
This research project investigated whether the mechanisms for periphyton removal in rivers relate more directly to hydraulic and geomorphic conditions than flow metrics.

Latest videos

Sally Watson - The science behind sediment cores
How do humans impact shallow marine environments?
Benthic Ecology in the Kaikōura canyon
Ashley Rowden and Katie Bigham talk about the positive changes observed on the seafloor following the 2016 Kaikōura earthquake.
Wire deployed corer floats being retrieved
Wire deployed corer floats being retrieved on board the RV Tangaroa. The corer sampled sediments at 9994 metre depths in the Kermadec Trench.
ST47 9990m landing
Wire deployed corer landing at 9994 metre depth in the Kermadec Trench. Deployment and retrieval on board the RV Tangaroa.

At the time that the NRWQN was developed, the incorporation of benthic (river bed) biological monitoring was considered quite innovative.

Seagrass beds form an important undersea habitat for small fish, seahorses and shellfish in New Zealand.

Researchers at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) have contributed their findings to a major news release by the Census of Marine Life charting an astonishing abundance, diversity, and distribution of deep-sea species.

Scientists from the UK, Japan and New Zealand have successfully photographed the deepest fish in the southern hemisphere at 7561 metres deep in the Kermadec Trench, just northeast of New Zealand.

Three new posters of the Cook Strait and Wellington Harbour seabed reveal for the first time a treasure trove of detailed information for the benefit of all New Zealanders.

An international team led by scientists from the United States and New Zealand have observed, for the first time, the bizarre deep-sea communities living around methane seeps off New Zealand’s east coast.

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All staff working on this subject

Principal Scientist - Fisheries
Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Strategy Manager - Coasts & Estuaries
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Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
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Marine Invertebrate Systematist
Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Fisheries Scientist
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Marine Biology Technician
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Marine Ecology Technician
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Marine Ecology Technician
Principal Technician - Marine Biology
Principal Technician - Marine Geology
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