Help us build a better niwa.co.nz for you by filling out our annual survey

No.09 2006

Mammoth UNCLOS submission filed

Measuring trace gases in the open ocean

Mapping Marlborough's complex currents

Revealing the forces that shape beaches

Revealing the forces that shape beaches

Revealing the forces that shape beaches

A time-averaged picture of Tairua Beach. The two white bands indicate the positions of the shoreline (left) and sandbar (right). Hourly Cam-Era images from eight New Zealand beaches can be accessed from the Cam-era website.

Understanding what causes some parts of beaches to erode and others to build up is important for coastal dwellers and developers.

Mammoth UNCLOS submission filed

Mammoth UNCLOS submission filed

Part of the UNCLOS team with the mammoth submission, spanning 24 report folders, 2683 pages, 72 chart sheets, 90 seismic sections, and 4 CD/DVDs of digital data. L to R: Russell Turner (LINZ), Vaughan Stagpoole (GNS Science), Kelly Lafoga (LINZ), Elana Geddis (MFAT), Ian Wright (NIWA), Kevin Mackay (NIWA).

The final report and submission of the New Zealand Continental Shelf Project was filed with the United Nations in April.

Measuring trace gases in the open ocean

Measuring trace gases in the open ocean

A semi-autonomous analytical instrument developed by NIWA is being used to measure key trace gases in the open ocean, allowing us to determine how important the oceanic source of these gases is relative to emissions by humans.
We’re using the instrument to take continuous measurements of methane and nitrous oxide (both greenhouse gases), and carbon monoxide (important in the atmosphere’s chemistry) in air and surface waters around New Zealand over periods of 6–7 days.

Research subject: Oceans