No.11 2006

Ocean Survey 20/20 gets underway

What happens to nutrients in estuaries?

Sophisticated sonar for marine habitat mapping

Ashley Estuary in good shape

Bounty and Antipodes Islands surveyed

Bounty and Antipodes Islands surveyed

Bounty and Antipodes Islands surveyed

Antipodes

NIWA has recently submitted results of hydrographic surveys of the Bounty and Antipodes Islands to Land Information New Zealand (LINZ).
These rugged, uninhabited islands lie in subantarctic waters 650 to 850 km southeast of New Zealand, forming the southeastern sector of our Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).
The seafloor around the islands was mapped from RV Tangaroa last year using high-resolution multibeam echosounding equipment.

Ashley Estuary in good shape

Ashley Estuary in good shape

Ashley Estuary

Environment Canterbury (ECan) commissioned NIWA to survey the central and southern portion of the Ashley Estuary following its designation as an Area of Significant Natural Value.
The survey was to provide baseline information on the estuary’s intertidal sediments and associated biota (plant and animal life), and to compare the current state of the sediments with their condition when last surveyed in 1982.
Results showed that the organic content of the sediments was generally low.

What happens to nutrients in estuaries?

What happens to nutrients in estuaries?

Estimated concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) (top) and phytoflagellates (phytoplankton, bottom) in the Firth of Thames.

Recent modelling by NIWA scientists is improving our understanding of nutrient cycling in estuaries.
Many estuaries around New Zealand are receiving increased nutrient inputs from their catchments.

Sophisticated sonar for marine habitat mapping

Sophisticated sonar for marine habitat mapping

Map of seafloor habitat types on Wellington’s south coast.

NIWA vessels’ multibeam sonar capabilities offer a rapid, accurate means of mapping marine habitats, with myriad applications.
NIWA recently applied this technology to map 46 square kilometres of seafloor habitats in and around the proposed Taputeranga Marine Reserve on Wellington’s south coast, in conjunction with Victoria University and the Department of Conservation.
Combining the shallow water capabilities of survey launch Pelorus and RV Kaharoa enabled the team

Ocean Survey 20/20 gets underway

Ocean Survey 20/20 gets underway

An orange roughy swims above a stony coral reef on the Pyre seamount, northern Chatham Rise, at a depth of 1020 m.

RV Tangaroa spearheaded the first of the Government’s Ocean Survey 20/20 (OS 20/20) projects last month with the first of three voyages to the Chatham Rise and Challenger Plateau.
OS 20/20 is a long-term Government strategy to survey and explore New Zealand’s oceans, including those around Antarctica, to better manage and sustainably use their resources.
Little is known about the biodiversity of New Zealand’s offshore seabed

Research subject: Coasts