No.06 2005

Modelling aquaculture effects in the Firth of Thames

To San Diego, via Chile

Habitat map for taiapure

When paua seek a home

Hear world experts on seafloor mapping

Modelling aquaculture effects in the Firth of Thames

Modelling aquaculture effects in the Firth of Thames
A new simulation model of nutrient and phytoplankton dynamics developed by NIWA is being used in the Firth of Thames.

Time & depth averaged simulated concentrations of dinoflagellates, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, diatoms, and phytoflagellates in the Firth of Thames, May 2003. The scale is the log of the concentration in milligrams per cubic metre. This work was funded by the Auckland Regional Council, Environment Waikato, and the Western Firth Marine Farming Consortium.

Habitat map for taiapure

Habitat map for taiapure

NIWA produced this interactive CD-ROM to accompany the habitat map. The taiapure committee can click on points of interest on the map and view side scans of the seabed, and video footage of habitat and species, at that location.

The Wakapuaka Taiapure covers over 15 km of coastline and extends up to 4 km offshore from Cable Bay to Whangamoa Head in northern Tasman Bay.
The Department of Conservation, in association with the Taiapure Committee, contracted NIWA to survey the nearshore area to map reefs and other seafloor features.

Hear world experts on seafloor mapping

Hear world experts on seafloor mapping

Xavier Lurton and Jean-Marie Augustin from IFREMER, the French Institute for the Exploitation of the Sea, are visiting NIWA under the Royal Society ISAT programme. They will present a one-day workshop on the processing and use of multibeam backscatter imagery for seafloor substrate mapping.
When: Wednesday, 9 November
Where: NIWA, Greta Point, Wellington
Attendance, including lunch, is free. Registrations are required by 1 November. www.niwascience.co.nz/ncco/courses

When paua seek a home

When paua seek a home

This map shows a snapshot of modelled larval distribution. Blue areas have the least larvae; red areas have the most. The arrows show the direction and speed of currents. An eddy has formed in the lee of the headland at the entrance to Tolaga Bay and larvae are concentrating near the centre of the eddy.

Shellfish larvae are transported along the coast by marine currents, but how far do the larvae spread and how effectively do they settle?

To San Diego, via Chile

To San Diego, via Chile

RV Kaharoa leaves this month on Argo 5 to San Diego via Chile and return. In 2006, Kaharoa will travel west to Mauritius (‘Argo 6’). Kaharoa was also used on Argo 1, 2, & 4. Argo 3, to the Southern Ocean, was conducted by RV Tangaroa. NIWA has deployed more floats than any other organisation.

NIWA’s 28-metre research vessel Kaharoa sets sail shortly to deploy more ocean-profiling Argo floats across the Pacific.

Mudbank. [Malcolm Green]
Research subject: Coasts