Feature story

Sadie Mills has come a long way from scaring the inhabitants of Scottish rock pools. Sarah Fraser explains.
A few drops of rain can go a long way. Campbell Gardiner explains.
Estuaries provide a crucial link between our rivers and our seas. Sam Fraser-Baxter heads out with a NIWA research team keeping a close eye on these vulnerable transition zones.
A large, orange Scandinavian robot gives NIWA’s marine geologists an in-depth look at changes to the seafloor off Kaikōura.
New Zealanders and Pacific Island communities are on their way to having the most advanced tsunami monitoring system in the world.
How much is too much? Susan Pepperell looks at some of the tough decisions looming around access to freshwater and how science is helping with solutions.
On a still and sunny December day when most Kiwis were looking longingly towards the beach, two NIWA researchers staff had their eyes firmly on the Southern Alps.
New Zealand’s native fish are doing their best to climb up ramps in a NIWA laboratory so scientists can learn how to better help them navigate our tricky waterways.
A team of scientists have been exploring some of New Zealand’s most remote and rugged coastal zones.
A NIWA researcher has found the first evidence that female deep sea sharks store sperm as a strategy to preserve the species and possibly avoid aggressive mating encounters.
Where there’s mud, there’s scientists. NIWA divers recently got down and dirty while completing a harbour-wide dive survey in the Wellington area.
In 1872 the HMS Challenger left Portsmouth in the UK on a four-year circumnavigation of the globe to explore the deepsea.
Jellyfish blooms are likely to be a common sight this summer with rising ocean temperatures one of the main causes of substantial population growths.
A vital network of rainfall and climate station volunteers across Aotearoa send their weather measurements to NIWA every month where they are used by scientists researching New Zealand’s climate.
When scientists head south to Antarctica on board NIWA research vessel Tangaroa next month, they’ll be keeping a close eye out for an animal that is particularly good at staying out of sight.
What does science tell us about New Zealand freshwater mussels?
NIWA environmental monitoring technician Mike O’Driscoll has just installed two water level stations in Samoa and is starting on a third—all from the comfort of his Greymouth office.
A network of state-of-the-art tsunami buoys is being deployed from New Zealand up into the Pacific to keep communities safer.
Campbell Gardiner explains how hundreds of lines of computer code generated each week are helping biosecurity authorities keep a close eye on a plant pathogen.
Albatrosses may be masters of the skies, but they are surprisingly vulnerable on the water. Campbell Gardiner talks to two scientists working to keep these magnificent seabirds airborne.
This award-winning kingfish sashimi dish is creating quite a splash – but it doesn’t come from the sea. We look at NIWA’s latest aquaculture success story and the new opportunities it’s on path to deliver.
Getting tangled up in seaweed or using supercomputers to unravel climate change – NIWA scientists go to great lengths to find fresh answers.
NIWA’s Chief Executive John Morgan looks at the role science will play in New Zealand’s post-Covid recovery.
Five specialist NIWA divers were left ‘gasping’ during their recent plunge under the ice near Scott Base.
It has been a whirlwind first six months for Ngāpera Keegan and Tekiteora Rolleston-Gabel, the first two young researchers in NIWA’s newly established Māori Graduate Internship Programme.

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