Videos

See NIWA scientists talking about their work, along with fascinating animations and underwater footage.

Big Fish, Calm Sea - White Shark Tagging off Stewart Island
Tagging White Sharks off Stewart Island, NZ Scientists from DOC, NIWA, and the University of Auckland are building a unique picture of New Zealand's great white shark population.
Biodiversity in the Kermadecs
This amazing footage was captured at the Kermadec Ridge in 2011, by NIWA's Deep-Towed Imaging System (DTIS). 
Science in the City - overview
The Science in the City event, held at The Cloud in Auckland on the 12th of April, was a great success. This video shows some of the science that was on display. 
ROV Fiordland footage
Never before seen footage. This amazing footage was captured by our ROV in the Fiordland Sounds.
Climate Change and Deepsea Life
Dr Dave Bowden outlines concerns over the impacts of climate change on deepsea life in Antarctic waters.
Southern Blue Whiting Fishery
NIWA fisheries scientist Dr Stuart Hanchet describes the history and management of the southern blue whiting fishery, centred around New Zealand's subantarctic islands.
Sea Ice and Climate Change
Dr Mike Williams, physical oceanographer at NIWA, explains the importance of Antarctic sea ice in the Earth's ocean and climate systems and how they may be affected by climate change.
The Microbial Loop
The microbial loop refers to the small microscopic organisms in the ocean – viruses, bacteria, the small phytoplankton and microzooplankton – and the relationships between them.
Climate Change and the Microbial Loop
NIWA biological oceanographer Dr Julie Hall explains how increased sea temperatures are predicted to increase stratification of the ocean, creating a disconnect between the surface waters and deep ocean.
Antarctic Coastal Marine Life in a Changing Climate
NIWA marine ecologist Dr Vonda Cummings discusses the likely effects of climate change on marine invertebrates living on the seafloor of the Ross Sea coast.
Antarctic Climate Change
NIWA climate scientist Dr James Renwick explains what changes are occurring in the Antarctic in response to climate change and what's likely to happen in the future.
Antarctic Marine Food Webs
NIWA biological oceanographer Dr Matt Pinkerton discusses the complexities of Antarctic marine food webs, the uniqueness of many of Antarctica's marine animals and the extreme adaptations they display.
The Decline of Subantarctic Wildlife
Populations of rockhopper penguins, elephant seals, and grey-headed albatrosses in the subantarctic have declined quite markedly in recent decades.
Ocean Acidification
The oceans are an important sink for atmospheric CO2, but as they take up increasing amounts of CO2 they are becoming more acidic.
Exploring Antarctic Deepsea Life
Most of the Southern Ocean outside of the narrow Antarctic continental shelf is more than 3000 m deep. This poses a real challenge for scientists studying the assemblages of animals living on the seabed.
Next Stop Antarctica
Our Far South is an expedition that aims to raise New Zealanders' awareness of the area south of Stewart Island. Gareth Morgan, Te Radar, scientists and 50 everyday Kiwis are onboard to learn and then share their experience. This is the first video produced by them, showing some of the highlights of the trip so far.
Ecosystem Effects and Mitigation of the Toothfish Fishery
NIWA fisheries scientist Dr Stuart Hanchet describes the guiding principles that CCAMLR (the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Life) applies to the Antarctic toothfish fishery.
The Antarctic Toothfish Fishery
Antarctic toothfish are fished using longlines in southern Antarctic waters. NIWA fisheries scientist Alistair Dunn describes the history of the fishery and how it has been monitored.
Current and Future Management of the Toothfish Fishery
NIWA fisheries scientist Dr Stuart Hanchet explains what makes the Antarctic toothfish fishery one of the best managed fisheries in the world.
Southern Ocean Productivity
Phytoplankton – microscopic plants that drift in the sunlit waters of the world's oceans – are the engine that drives all of Antarctica's marine food webs.

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